Introduction to The Prince Hitachi Prize for Comparative Oncology


The Prince Hitachi Prize for Comparative Oncology was established on November 28, 1995 by the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research in commemoration of the sixtieth birthday of His Imperial Highness Prince Hitachi and his long devotion to cancer research. The Prize is administered by the Foundation’s Prince Hitachi Prize for Comparative Oncology Committee and is awarded to promote research in cancer and related fields.

Prince Hitachi, after graduation from Gakushuin University, continued his study of cell biology at the Zoological Department of the University of Tokyo from 1958 to 1969. From June 1969, he first studied chemical carcinogenesis and then comparative oncology of lower animals (especially fish and frogs) at the Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research as a guest researcher. The Prince became a member of the Japanese Cancer Association in February 1970 and has presented his works at the annual meetings of the Association almost every year since then. He has also been a corresponding member of the American Association for Cancer Research since May 1977 and has published more than forty papers in English. Since January 2001, Prince Hitachi has been Honorary President of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research.

The Prince Hitachi Prize is awarded for notable work within the field of cancer research defined as being the same one in which the Prince has been studying; namely, comparative oncology and related subjects. Research in this field is the basis of cancer and biology studies and its progress is highly desirable.

Professor Vera Gorbunova and Associate Professor Andrei Seluanov have been selected as the Awardees of the Prize for 2014. Both doctors jointly analyzed fibroblasts of the Naked Mole Rat which is known for having a long and cancer-free life, and clarified the cancer resistance properties and mechanisms of this rodent’s cells in culture. Their important work makes a valuable contribution to research on cancer prevention and life longevity.


Outline of the Prince Hitachi Prize for Comparative Oncology

The Prince Hitachi Prize for Comparative Oncology was instituted on November 27, 1995 by the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research to promote the increased research in cancer and related field in commemoration of the sixtieth birthday of Prince Hitachi and his longtime devotion to cancer research at the Cancer Institute, the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research. The Prize is made by the Committee on the Prince Hitachi Prize for Comparative Oncology of the Foundation.


The crest and the symbol tree of the Prince Hitachi Family are depicted.
The tree is the Ogatama-no-ki (Michelia compressa Maxim. a kind of Magnolia).
The Chinese characters at the center are read the Prince Hitachi Prize for
Comparative Oncology.

The Prize will be awarded in accordance with the following:

  1. The Prize shall be made by the Committee every year, commencing in 1996.
  2. The Prize shall consist of a certificate of merit, a medal, a memorial and a prize of one million (1,000,000)yen.
  3. There shall be no restrictions on the nationality of the recipient.
  4. The Prize shall normally be made to one individual. In the event of a Prize being shared by two or more individuals, each shall receive a certificate, a medal, a memorial and an equal share of the prize.
  5. The Prize shall be awarded to an individual or individuals who, in the judgement of the members of the Committee, has made an outstanding contribution to the advancement of research in comparative oncology, especially in tumors of lower animals and related research fields.
  6. The Committee shall establish a selection committee and a funding committee.
  7. The Committee shall be advised on suitable candidates for the Prize by the selection committee.
  8. The selection committee shall invite nominations of candidates from such relevant individuals and organizations at home and abroad as the selection committee may deem appropriate.
  9. The nomination shall consist of:
    1. Full name, date of birth, nationality and address of the candidate.
    2. The candidate's academic or professional qualifications and position.
    3. A brief statement (1 or 2 pages) describing the candidate's achievements in relation to the purpose of the Prize.
    4. The name of the individual or institution making the nomination.
  10. The selection committee shall submit to the Committee a report containing recommendations of the candidate or candidates for the Prize and a supporting statement.
  11. The Prize shall be presented in Tokyo in spring every year. The recipient and his or her spouse shall be invited to attend the presentation ceremony at the expense of the Committee.
  12. The funding committee shall invite contributions for the Prize.

News

July 1, 2014 Website open.
  http://www.jfcr.or.jp/